Andrew M. Moravec, writer and game designer. Beware long social rants and animated pictures of cats.
Reblogged from jtotheizzoe  1,298 notes

jtotheizzoe:

okkultmotionpictures:

EXCERPTS  >|< Your Body During Adolescence (1955)

A video from Prelinger Archive.

A series of gifs excerpted from Your Body During Adolescence. Shows the seven glands that regulate human life and growth with emphasis on the pituitary and sex glands. Outlines changes that take place in the bodies of boys and girls.

Do you really know your body? From the age of 12-15, you’re basically just a rapidly expanding bag of glands (according to this video, anyway, which you can watch in full below):

Yes, it’s a funny look back in time. But sadly, 60 years later, this is still how many young people are introduced to sexual education, with sex only spoken about as a way to make babies, and adolescence only serving as a stepping stone to life as a responsible, working adult (who, of course, wants to get married and make babies). Adolescence is perhaps the most crucial period of a person’s life, in which you experiment and question and discover and change all sorts of things about your mind and body. Yes, in the end you become an adult, but instead of the mythical and somber suit/tie/apron/job/baby definition put forth in these antiquated videos, you should consider being an adult as becoming just a slightly older person who experiments and questions and discovers and changes all sorts of things about their mind and body.

For a look at how sex ed should be done, you really should be watching the Sexpalantions channel with Dr. Doe on YouTube!! Appropriately, here is her video “Sex is Not Black and White”:

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe  6,950 notes
jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea saltGreen = organicsRed = dustWhite = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea salt
Green = organics
Red = dust
White = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe  577 notes
jtotheizzoe:

alphynix:

February on this blog is going to be Daily Paleo Art Month! Because doing dinosaurs all last July was so much fun I want to do this thing again. Every weekday for the rest of the month I’ll be posting a new image of something strange, obscure, or just plain interesting from the fossil record — only this time we’re staying firmly outside of the Avemetatarsalia (pterosaurs and dinosaurs/birds) to give some less famous critters the spotlight.
#1: Helicoprion
A cartilaginous fish from off the southwest coast of the ancient supercontinent Gondwana (and later Pangaea), Helicoprion first appeared in the late Carboniferous (310 million years ago) and survived up until just past the massive Permian-Triassic extinction (250mya). Despite looking rather shark-like and possibly reaching sizes of around 6m (20ft) long, it was actually closer related to the chimaeras.
For a long time, the only parts of this animal known were bizarre buzzsaw-like spiral whorls of teeth, since cartilage skeletons very rarely fossilize. The ideas for just where in the body this structure was positioned were ridiculously varied.
The most recent reconstruction is based on CT scans of a well-preserved fossil with jaw and skull elements, which showed the whorl taking up the whole lower jaw. It also turns out Helicoprion had no upper teeth at all. It’s thought to have used this arrangement to shred and crush up squid and other soft-bodied marine prey, but there’s still very little known about how such a unique type of teeth evolved in the first place.


I think evolution must work like Ikea, because occasionally nature completely misread the directions and puts a piece on backwards.

jtotheizzoe:

alphynix:

February on this blog is going to be Daily Paleo Art Month! Because doing dinosaurs all last July was so much fun I want to do this thing again.
 Every weekday for the rest of the month I’ll be posting a new image of something strange, obscure, or just plain interesting from the fossil record — only this time we’re staying firmly outside of the Avemetatarsalia (pterosaurs and dinosaurs/birds) to give some less famous critters the spotlight.

#1: Helicoprion

A cartilaginous fish from off the southwest coast of the ancient supercontinent Gondwana (and later Pangaea), Helicoprion first appeared in the late Carboniferous (310 million years ago) and survived up until just past the massive Permian-Triassic extinction (250mya). Despite looking rather shark-like and possibly reaching sizes of around 6m (20ft) long, it was actually closer related to the chimaeras.

For a long time, the only parts of this animal known were bizarre buzzsaw-like spiral whorls of teeth, since cartilage skeletons very rarely fossilize. The ideas for just where in the body this structure was positioned were ridiculously varied.

The most recent reconstruction is based on CT scans of a well-preserved fossil with jaw and skull elements, which showed the whorl taking up the whole lower jaw. It also turns out Helicoprion had no upper teeth at all. It’s thought to have used this arrangement to shred and crush up squid and other soft-bodied marine prey, but there’s still very little known about how such a unique type of teeth evolved in the first place.

I think evolution must work like Ikea, because occasionally nature completely misread the directions and puts a piece on backwards.

Reblogged from wtfevolution  602 notes

wtfevolution:

"So I’m thinking of trying live birth in the tsetse fly.”

"What? Why? What’s wrong with laying eggs like all the other insects?"

"I don’t know, it just seems so inefficient. You go to all the trouble of making eggs, and then most of them just get squished or frozen or eaten for dinner before they can even develop. Why not just pop out a whole larva once a week and then be done with it?"

"Once a week?”

"Well, yeah, they’ve got to keep up with the egg-layers somehow."

"Gross, evolution."

"Miraculous, you mean."

Well, that’s not horrifying at all…

Reblogged from outofficial  57 notes
outofficial:

My Buddy: WWII Soldiers &amp; Sailors at Their Most Unguarded

“Between battles they were able to bathe in makeshift showers and in rivers, lakes, and streams; to swim; catch a few rays and just mess around like the kids they recently were,” writes the book’s editor, Dian Hanson. These jaunts often took place in the buff. As former WWII Marine and memoirist Scotty Bowers puts it in My Buddy’s intro, “There 2013 aren’t many of those shy types in the Marines.”

MORE SNEAK PEEK IMAGES

outofficial:

My Buddy: WWII Soldiers & Sailors at Their Most Unguarded

“Between battles they were able to bathe in makeshift showers and in rivers, lakes, and streams; to swim; catch a few rays and just mess around like the kids they recently were,” writes the book’s editor, Dian Hanson. These jaunts often took place in the buff. As former WWII Marine and memoirist Scotty Bowers puts it in My Buddy’s intro, “There 2013 aren’t many of those shy types in the Marines.”

MORE SNEAK PEEK IMAGES